I flew from Toronto to L.A. and ended up sitting beside a nice guy named Justin, who is a movie executive in Hollywood for a major studio. We started chatting and we hit it off.

At one point, I told him that I had a great idea for a movie and that he could have it. He was generous enough to listen to my story. Then he started smiling and then even laughing a little. He liked my idea enough to give me his card. He told me he couldn’t have that idea because it was actually pretty good, and he asked that I send it to him via email.

I told him, again, that he could have it and explained that I’m too busy to do anything with it. I’m a Dad, I love the work that I do and I’m proud of my groovy little company. Factor in a whack of ski days and summers on the lake and who has time to become the next big thing?

Besides, I love doing what I do. So you’re stuck with me.

I emailed him my idea, roughed out the key points again and said in my note that now my offer was in writing, and he could have it.

That idea, a comedy, is a brilliant big idea. So is my idea for a spy story that takes place in my city, Ottawa, the capital of Canada.

So is my idea for a dog hotel near the airport.

I have an idea, brilliant and big, for how I could turn a gas station in rural Quebec into a can’t miss destination.

Have I told you about my idea to release live tigers onto the baseball field to spice things up?

How about a mutual fund made up exclusively of companies that have embraced the Experience Economy?

Can you imagine the money you could make if you could create a fish that tastes like steak?

How about an over-the-counter pill that when ingested makes you feel like you are stretching and lasts for 45 minutes?

Does it get much more brilliant and big than that?

Take any of these ideas and run with them. You can have them. I’m already busy and ideas are free.

I have always felt that the more often you create and share ideas, the better you get at it. That’s why I write the blog. The blog keeps me thinking (and thinking) about the Experience Economy, and entrepreneurship, and transformation, and how we can all do more work that matters.

Practice improves both the quality and the quantity of what you create. For me anyway.

History is strewn with inventors who had brilliant big ideas but kept them quiet and then poorly executed them. And history is rife with initiators who took one of the big brilliant ideas that were floating around in the cosmic goo and actually made something happen. Most successful things are an unoriginal idea, properly executed.

So quit hoarding and keeping your ideas. Let them go. They are probably holding you back from the hard work of actually executing.

 

 

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